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December 8. 2017

FAQ Friday: How are phonics and word study integrated into Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™?

A: Phonics, spelling, and word study are woven into the various instructional contexts within Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ (FPC) including:

Phonics, Spelling and Word Study System: The lessons in this system are systematic, and sequenced with built-in flexibility for teachers to choose which minilessons to use and when, according to the needs of the students. Each “Teach” activity within the minilessons is designed for use with the whole class, and the “Apply” activity could be used with a small group, pair, or an individual student. All of the revised lessons are derived and connected to principles from The Fountas & Pinnell Comprehensive Phonics, Spelling and Word Study Guide, which reflects the specific behaviors related to the nine areas of learning for letters, sounds, and words that children develop over time:

  1. Early Literacy Concepts
  2. Phonological Awareness
  3. Letter Knowledge
  4. Letter-Sound Relationships
  5. Spelling Patterns
  6. High-Frequency Words
  7. Word Meaning/Vocabulary
  8. Word Structure
  9. Word-Solving Actions

FPC Shared Reading Collection: The lessons in the FPC Shared Reading Collection include suggested Phonological Awareness/Phonics/Word Study goals taken from The Literacy Continuum that the text used in the lesson will support the teacher in helping students achieve.

FPC Guided Reading Collection: The goals embedded within the FPC Guided Reading Collection lessons apply the principles from The Fountas & Pinnell Comprehensive Phonics, Spelling and Word Study Guide. In addition, an important component of each FPC Guided Reading Collection lesson are brief, but focused attention to words and how they work in the form of an embedded phonics activity that is based on the Planning for Letter and Word Work After Guided Reading feature from the Guided Reading continuum in The Literacy Continuum.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>


November 21. 2017

Teacher Tip: Organizing Your Classroom for Shared Reading

As you arrange your classroom for shared reading, be sure to accommodate children so that every child can see the big book or chart. Store texts and tools nearby for easy access.

Texts:

  • large print books
  • projected texts
  • shared/interactive writing texts
  • small copies of large texts

Tools:

  • easel
  • plain pointer
  • Wikki Stix®
  • word cards
  • highlighter tape
  • magnetic letters
  • whiteboard
  • pocket chart
  • word masks of various sizes
  • markers
  • correction tape and sticky notes
  • computer and screen, or document camera, to project an image
From Fountas & Pinnell Classroom System Guide by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2018 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

November 3. 2017

FAQ Friday: How Long is a Shared Reading Lesson?

Q: How long is a Shared Reading lesson?

A: You should spend 10 minutes each day doing shared reading, and each shared reading book should be revisited several times over multiple days.  How many days you stay with a book depends on how engaged the students are with the text.

Example lesson:

  • Day/sitting 1– teacher reads and discusses text to the children and children read the whole text with the teacher
  • Day/sitting 2 – children read the text with the teacher (may be for a different purpose or the same as the day before) and discuss
  • Day/sitting 3 or more – children read the text with the teacher for various purposes until the teacher feels it is time to move to another book.

There is not just one way to do shared reading and it is not really a straight linear progression.  You may revisit a book more than once and target something different each time.  You can also reread the same book during a different sitting in the same day.

August 1. 2017

4 Tools to Support Shared Reading Instruction

Every teacher needs tools to support their instruction. In shared reading, the following key tools will be helpful to support your lesson as you read and teach from an enlarged text on an easel. You may wish to store these materials nearby for easy access.

  • Plain pointer: A thin dowel rod with the tip painted red or with a pencil eraser on the end works well for drawing children’s eyes to the print and features that you are discussing.
  • Wikki Stix®: These sticky plastic sticks can be formed into letters or used to underline or circle words or letters. They adhere to the pages of a book, are easily removed, and can be reused.
  • Highlighter tape: You may wish to have several colors of tape to help readers identify various elements of print. For example, you may wish to use different colors to draw attention to various spelling patterns or types of punctuation.
  • Masking card: Available in Online Resources in various sizes, masking cards bring sharp attention to words within continuous text. The mask places a frame around a word so that children can isolate and concentrate on it.

For a complete list of tools you may wish to have on hand, see page 26 in the Fountas & Pinnell Classroom System Guide (available Fall 2017) or pages 65–66 in Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades.

From Fountas & Pinnell Classroom System Guide by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2018 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

June 30. 2017

Here’s HOW to Order Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™

It's finally here! Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ is no longer just a glimmer in our eye. The beautiful books are NOW being printed and assembled with the lessons. It's getting ready to fill your shelves and enhance your instruction. More...

May 17. 2017

This Is Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™

Over the past few months, we have slowly pulled back the curtain on Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™--a first-of-its-kind system for high-quality, classroom-based literacy instruction. There have been blog posts, webinars, and Twitter chats covering every angle of this exciting new system. In case you missed anything, below is a recap. More...

April 18. 2017

RECAP of 4/17/2017 Twitter Chat on Putting Shared Reading into Action with Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™


On Monday, May 4, Heinemann hosted a Twitter Chat in which they interviewed authors Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell about the role of Shared Reading in their newest system, Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ (FPC). People from all over the country followed along in order to learn more about putting Shared Reading into action with this exciting, first-of-its-kind, cohesive system for high-quality classroom-based literacy instruction. Followers engaged in a discussion about many different angles of Shared Reading, including its importance to young readers and how it is used within a classroom literacy system. Heinemann also interviewed Fountas and Pinnell about some of features in the Shared Reading component of Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™. Followers learned about what makes the books special and what they can expect to see in the lessons that accompany each authentic book. Some favorite tweets included: More...


February 2. 2017

Announcing Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™

The Future of Literacy Education is HERE!

Heinemann and Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ are pleased to announce the soon-to-be-released Fountas & Pinnell Classroom, a cohesive, multi-text approach to literacy instruction for all students in grades PreK–6. The System is designed to support whole-group, small-group and independent learning opportunities including: interactive read-aloud, reading minilessons, shared reading, phonics/spelling/word study lessons, guided reading, book clubs, and independent reading collections.  Fountas & Pinnell Classroom is rich with authentic texts, lessons or conferring cards, minilessons and professional tools & learning for a systematic, transformative approach to literacy instruction.

Click here to learn how Fountas & Pinnell Classroom  will lift students' learning beyond the walls of the classroom with texts and a blueprint for teaching that create authentic experiences in reading, thinking, talking, writing, and reflecting to realize what it truly means to live a literate life.