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February 20. 2018

Teacher Tip: Incorporating Play Into Your Kindergarten Classroom

Play is an essential component of the kindergarten classroom. Throughout early childhood, the foundation of reading and writing is joyful play, language, and literacy experiences. Through play, children practice and gain control of abilities essential to learning, including language, self-regulation, and high-level thinking. As you design your classroom, you will want to provide space for choice time activities, including free and structured play. These areas may include resources for dramatic play, blocks, a sand/water table, and art supplies.

From Literacy Beginnings by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (C) 2011 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann

February 16. 2018

FAQ Friday: Is There a Lexile Correlation Chart for Fountas & Pinnell Levels?

Q: Is there a Lexile correlation chart for Fountas & Pinnell levels?

A: No, there is no correlation chart. There are several approaches to determining a text's level of complexity. Metametrics, the company that provides Lexile measures, takes one approach by measuring text complexity with a proprietary computer algorithm that measures sentence length, syllables, and word frequency.

The levels in the F&P Text Level Gradient™ are based on ten text factors: Genre/Form, Text Structure, Content, Themes and Ideas, Language and Literary Features, Sentence Complexity, Vocabulary, Words, Illustrations, and Book and Print Features. A level obtained from a Benchmark Assessment differs from that obtained with a Lexile assessment in that comprehension is a key factor in the Benchmark Assessment. A student might very well be able to decode high-level texts, but a Benchmark Assessment also determines if the student's comprehension is good enough for instruction.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

February 15. 2018

Opportunities to Foster Thoughtful Talk


Students’ talk reflects their thinking. When students talk about what they are reading, they reveal their understandings and perspectives; communicate and refine their ideas; make meaning from texts; and make connections to their own experiences. Thoughtful talk is a treasure trove of information that will help inform your teaching.

Students need robust opportunities for varied talk structures within many different instructional contexts. Here are some settings in which you can foster those opportunities! More...


February 13. 2018

9 Tips for Introducing New Words to Learn

As you help children learn new words, use some of the following teaching suggestions:

  1. Use language that makes it clear you are talking about a word (not a letter): “This word is [word].” (Some children confuse letters and words and may be focusing on only a part.)
  2. Encourage children to look at the beginning of the word and show them what that means.
  3. Read the word as you run your finger under it, left to right.
  4. Ask children to look closely at the word and say what they notice at the beginning.
  5. Ask children to look at the word and then read it as they run a finger under it, left to right.
  6. Use another word to help children remember a new word: an, and; the, then.
  7. Help children notice the first letter and then look across the word left to right to notice more.
  8. Give children magnetic letters in order to build the word left to right.
  9. Using magnetic letters, have children break a word by pulling down the first letter and then the rest of the letters. Then have them put it together again.

From Leveled Literacy Intervention Orange System Guide, Second Edition by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (C) 2017 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.