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February 17. 2017

Twitter Chat Recap on the NEW Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™

On Thursday, February 16, Heinemann hosted a Twitter Chat in which they interviewed authors Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell about their newest system, Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ (FPC). People from all over the country followed along in order to learn more about this exciting, first-of-its-kind, cohesive system for high-quality classroom-based literacy instruction. Educators were highly engaged making #FPLiteracy the #1 trending hashtag for the entire hour-long chat, and well into the night. Followers learned about everything from the instructional contexts that make up FPC to what is at the heart of the system. They learned about the many components and high-quality texts that are included while gaining insight into the philosophy that went into its creation.

To read the whole chat, click the link below. And mark your calendars to log in on Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 8 p.m. (EST) as we continue the exciting chat series on Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™! More...

February 14. 2017

How to Provide Opportunities for Processing Texts: A Teacher Tip from Fountas & Pinnell

Comprehending the fullest meaning of a text is the goal every time we read anything. We do not teach comprehension by applying one strategy to one book during one lesson: we help students learn how to focus on the meaning and interpretation of texts all the time, in every instructional context, each instance contributing in different ways to the same complex processing system. Below are some suggestions for you and your colleagues to provide your students with opportunities for processing texts:

1. Bring together a cross-grade-level group of colleagues to think about text experiences. You may want to have them work in small grade-level groups and then share as a whole group.

2. Use large chart paper divided into columns. As a group, consider (1) processing orally presented written texts; (2) processing written texts; and (3) acting on the meaning of texts after reading. These three actions occur across instructional contexts.

3. Have each group use their weekly schedules to discuss a week of instruction in their classroom. Make a list of all the processing opportunities students have in each of the three areas in the three columns on the chart paper.

4. Review the charts. Have the whole group participate in a larger discussion of how these opportunities can be expanded. Emphasize that there are specific ways of teaching for comprehending in each of these settings.


Excerpted from Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency: Thinking, Talking, and Writing About Reading by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2006 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

February 13. 2017

Daily Lit Bit - 2/13/2017

A learner might make tremendous gains in one area while seeming to almost “stand still” in another. It’s our job to provide these learning opportunities and guide their attention so that learning in one area supports learning in others.

February 10. 2017

What is Fountas & Pinnell Classroom?


There has been a lot of buzz over the last few months about the mysterious Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™. What is it? When will it be out? How can I get my hands on it?! Well it's official. The future of literacy education is finally here! More...