September 8. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 09/08/2016

Responsive teaching are those moment-to-moment decisions that teachers make as they observe and analyze their students’ behaviors.

(Excerpted from Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades, Second Edition. © 2017 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.)

September 7. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 09/07/2016

Learning does not automatically happen; most students need expert teaching to develop high levels of reading and writing expertise.

(Excerpted from The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum. © 2017 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.)

September 5. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 09/05/2016

Materials themselves will help teachers grow professionally, but alongside that teachers need good professional development. Professional development makes the work come alive.

September 2. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 09/02/2016

No matter how well you plan and structure learning tasks, it’s the one-on-one interactions that inform the power and effectiveness in your teaching.

(Excerpted from Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades, Second Edition. © 2017 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.)

September 1. 2016

What’s New in Guided Reading, Second Edition? It’s not a revision…it has been re-envisioned.


You’ve had your trusty white-covered copy of Guided Reading on your shelf for years. Its frayed edges and bent pages from constant referencing have made it difficult to jam in between other books. You’ve even written your name in black marker across the cover to deter potential thievery. It’s a familiar friend. And now there’s a new edition?! What?! Don’t panic. Your friend is still as inspiring as ever. This is not a revision to a classic text, but rather… it has been RE-envisioned.

 

While this second edition is a completely new text, the “nuts and bolts” of how to use guided reading are still there. There are many new changes, but we’ve listed the key differences below.

 

More Emphasis on Responsive Teaching

One of the most important differences in the second edition is the extra emphasis on responsive teaching. It’s even in the subtitle, “Responsive Teaching Across the Grades.” What is “responsive teaching” you ask?  “It is the observation and analysis of the students’ reading behaviors that informs your next teaching moves. No matter how well you plan and structure learning tasks, it’s the one-on-one interactions that inform the power and effectiveness in your teaching,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017). Responsive teaching is about teachers knowing their students well and knowing how to better teach them.

 

A Multi-text Approach to Teaching

Guided reading is important. We know that. But it isn’t the only instruction students need on a daily basis. In this edition, Fountas and Pinnell emphasize that guided reading should be embedded within a coherent literacy system, which means teaching that ranges from high teacher support, like interactive read-aloud and shared reading, all the way to independent reading. “Small-group instruction is more powerful when nested within a variety of instructional contexts with varying levels of support,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017).

 

A Focus on Creating a Community of Learners

One of the goals of this new edition is to get teachers to not only treat the classroom as a place to learn to read, write, and expand language skills, but to create a community of learners. “It is a laboratory where they learn how to be confident, self-determined, kind, and democratic,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017). This new edition provides teachers with a list of behavioral and emotional expectations to look for in students. If students are not displaying these behaviors, teachers can provide numerous opportunities to help build them up and develop a sense of agency.

 

Support for Teaching in a Diverse Classroom

Fountas and Pinnell believe that there is an increasing need to prepare our children to become global citizens. Throughout this new edition there are many references that show teachers how to support English language learners by addressing the unique ways they can adjust their teaching to serve these students well.

 

Examples of Student-teacher Interactions

While students are learning a new topic, it is helpful for them to see demonstrations on how it is done. It is also helpful for us adults sometimes. For that reason, Fountas and Pinnell have provided many helpful examples of student-teacher interactions within guided reading groups in a clearly laid-out chart form.

 

New, Super Pretty, Colorful Book Features

There are over 100 full-color spreads of guided reading books, example charts, classroom photos, and more that punctuate the teachings throughout this new book. It’s just plain stunning. 

 

So yes…it’s a whole new book. It’s a beautifully-written, clearly presented, colorful, important new edition of your old companion. The world has changed and so has the thinking surrounding small-group instruction. “Change is not good or bad—it’s simply inevitable,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017).

 

Jill Backman

Fountas & Pinnell Marketing Manager

 

Explore the NEW Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades at http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/guidedreading/

Join the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Facebook Learning Group for more collaborative conversation at https://www.facebook.com/groups/FountasPinnell/

 

References

Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. (2017). Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades, Second Edition. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

 

September 1. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 09/01/2016

It is the observation and analysis of the students’ reading behaviors that informs your next teaching moves.

(Excerpted from Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades, Second Edition. © 2017 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.)

August 31. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 08/31/2016

A learner might make tremendous gains in one area while seeming to almost "stand still" in another. It's our job to provide these learning opportunities and guide their attention so that learning in one area supports learning in others.

(Excerpted from The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum. © 2017 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.)

August 30. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 08/30/2016

Every child, every single day, should have the opportunity to read many texts with understanding and fluency. Within a community of readers and writers, that can happen.

August 29. 2016

Making Your Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System (BAS) Conferences Efficient and Informative

This is the time of year for getting to know each of your new students as unique individuals in your classroom community. Your BAS conference is a wonderful opportunity to spend a short time with each child to get a big payoff.

Think about the following tips as they may help you establish more efficient and informative BAS conferences with your students.

Making a Schedule
It’s a good idea to make a schedule for conducting your assessments. Be proactive. For example, plan to have two or three assessment conferences a day and complete all the assessments within two to three weeks. Don’t let the assessments drag out for weeks.

Finding Time
Consider partnering up with a grade-level colleague so you can release each other to administer an assessment or two. For example, take turns reading aloud to both classes or taking both groups out for recess time. Think together about other opportunities that could enable both groups of students to engage in meaningful work together while you gain time for assessment conferences.

Conducting the Assessment Conference Efficiently
A key to an efficient conference is being organized, knowing where to begin the assessment and moving the assessment along at a good pace. When you start with a text that is easy, but not too easy for the student to read, the next book will likely be an instructional level. The third book read will likely be hard. As soon as the data shows the text is hard, you stop the assessment.
Think about how to organize yourself for an efficient administration. Organize the books by level in a pile. If you are using the iPad application, you will be paperless. If you are using paper, make several copies of each Recording Form, so you can quickly pull the form you need. Have your F&P Calculator/Stopwatch ready.
Use last year’s reading information to know where to start. Make a list of start levels for each student. You might also talk a minute with the student about what books he read over the summer to get a level indicator. In any case, you can talk to last year’s teacher.

Move the conference along at a good pace. Be sure to read all the books before you begin. Collect one book while handing over the next. The more assessments you give, the more familiar you will be with the prompts and you can move along at a good pace.

Learning More
The more you administer the BAS, the more efficient you will become. If the students read fluently, the assessment will be shorter. The goal is for the student to read one easy book with fluency, one instructional level book with fluency, and only part of one book that is hard.

Plan ahead for an efficient administration. And share tips for efficiency with your colleagues.

Our best to you as you start a new year.

-Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell.