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September 18. 2018

Close the Achievement Gap with LLI Multi-Day Institutes! Early-Bird Rates EXTENDED!

Learn how close the literacy achievement gap using the Fountas & Pinnell Leveled Literacy Intervention System through these two in-depth, multi-day institutes led by Fountas and Pinnell-trained consultants. Sign up by October 2nd and save $60 per person! These two informative institutes will be held in early November in beautiful Philadelphia, PA. Check out details below: 

November 56, 2018

Primary: Grades K, 1, and 2: 

Teaching Readers Who Struggle and Teaching with Levels A–N / LLI Orange, Green, and Blue systems

This two-day institute will focus on understanding the reading and writing challenges of children who struggle with literacy learning and how to provide effective teaching within the LLI primary lessons. 

Register here!

November 78, 2018

Intermediate, Middle, and Secondary: Grades 3–12: 

Intervening for Literacy Success with Levels L–Z / LLI Red, Gold, Purple, and Teal systems

In this interactive two-day institute, participants will be provided with a deep understanding of the LLI Red, Gold, Purple, and Teal systems for grades 3–12 and how they specifically meet the needs of struggling readers in those grades, and how to provide effective teaching within the LLI lessons. 

Register here!


September 17. 2018

Teacher Tip: Consider a Text with Your English Learners in Mind

As you examine a text for instruction, notice text factors that might be difficult for the English learners in your class. What are students' levels of background knowledge related to the topic? Think about vocabulary such as idioms, colloquialisms, contractions, and words with more than one meaning. Notice language structures, illustration support, and graphics. Consider cultural challenges.

From The Literacy Quick Guide: A Reference Tool for Responsive Literacy Teaching by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (C) 2018 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

September 17. 2018

Daily Lit Bit - 9/17/18

The books in a classroom library are not there for the purpose of “practicing reading,” but rather to create lifelong readers who have the power of choice.

September 13. 2018

Back-to-School Twitter Chat with Fountas and Pinnell

The start of the school year can be hectic! You can find yourself seeking guidance, especially if you are using new resources with new approaches to instruction. Luckily, Fountas and Pinnell will be hosting a Twitter Chat Thursday, 9/20 at 8:00 p.m. EST to address some of your frequently asked questions and hopefully provide some clarity!

Follow @FountasPinnell #FPLiteracy to get answers to questions like, how do I set up Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™, and how many LLI groups can I fit into one day? You might even have some tips of your own, so be prepared to share! 

Mark your calendars and spread the word to join Fountas and Pinnell next Thursday night for a practical chat on back-to-school bumps-in-the-road! 

~The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Team
September 13. 2018

FAQ Friday: Which High Frequency Word List Should I Use?

Q: Which high frequency word list should I use?

A: There is no set list for everyone to use in a grade or reading level because the words that are seen and used most frequently depends on the materials and instruction used in each setting. There are some suggested more commonly used words found across the U.S. in the Benchmark Assessment System Optional Assessments, in the Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study Lessons, and some suggestions are listed in The Literacy Continuum under the Phonics section and Guided Reading Word Work planning section. Word Matters also includes suggested lists.

Usually each school or district determines a list to be used locally based on the instructional materials used. If your district does not specify a particular list or sequence, teach the words your students need as they are needed based on their reading and writing throughout the year.

The Literacy Continuum suggests that students should have a core of 100 high utility words (that are read and written automatically and are used for reading and writing other words) by the end of first grade, and 200 by second grade. A good rule of thumb is that 100 words are added to this core for each school year. This automaticity helps with more flexibility in word solving when reading and writing. The focus is on the strategic use of the words not just the list.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

September 13. 2018

Daily Lit Bit - 9/13/18

We would never take a book out of child's hand. If a child wants to read a book, let them read a book. But we can help them choose books they will enjoy by conferring with them and looking at what they write about books.

September 10. 2018

Teacher Tip: 4 Steps to Cope with Testing Demand

Students in school are tested continually, and their success is most often measured by their performance on paper-and-pencil tests. The stakes are also high for teachers because their performance is judged by how many students meet the criteria for success. The demand for accountability is intense and has the potential to reduce the language and literacy continuum to a very narrow set of exercises. If we care about our students, we need to make sure test taking has positive outcomes. 

While we cannot ignore tests, we cannot let them control our lives and the lives of our students. We need to find ways to cope with the demands of the testing environment and still help our students have happy, productive, and satisfying literacy experiences. 

To cope with testing demands: 

  1. Analyze the genuine underlying skills that students need in order to be able to perform well on comprehensive proficiency tests. 
  2. Create an ongoing curriculum to help students develop the genuine reading and writing abilities that will provide a foundation for good test performance (as well as all the benefits of a literate life). 
  3. Analyze the ways of reading, writing, and displaying knowledge that tests require. 
  4. Familiarize students with the ways to display knowledge and skills that will be expected of them in test performance.
Without the first two steps, the others are ineffective. Being a competent reader and writer is basic to performing well on tests.

From Guiding Readers & Writers by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2001 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.