August 17. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 08/17/2016

A higher level of literacy achievement is obtained when all students feel a sense of agency, community, joy and reflection in their own learning.

August 16. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 08/16/2016

Effective teaching begins with what we know about learners and their literacy. Continual observations of what students do as readers and writers provide the best evidence of learning.

August 15. 2016

The Art and Science of Responsive Literacy Teaching


by Irene Fountas

What really matters for each child in his journey of reading development is your response to his attempts to process a text. When you respond precisely to the reader’s observable behaviors, you can meet the child where he is and lead him forward.

Clay helped us understand that when we notice and build on a reader’s strengths instead of targeting deficits, our teaching can be highly effective in building the student’s agency and independence. Each child’s response is often not simply right or wrong but “partially correct” (Clay, 300-301).  For example when a child reads “stairs” for “steps,” he made a meaningful attempt that fits the syntax and has letters that look similar. It is too simplistic to say it is wrong.

Think about the reader’s logic each time you notice a reading error. Think about what information the child used to make the attempt and how you can expand what the child can do to make sure the attempt makes sense, sounds right and looks right. For example, use language like the following:
•    “That makes sense, but does it look right?”
•    “That looks right but does it make sense?”
•    “You are almost right. Check the middle.”

Gay and I have explored the effects of teacher language in facilitating the reader’s construction of problem-solving behaviors in working through a text. The teacher’s “facilitative language” promotes the reader’s thinking. As a reading teacher, we encourage you to eliminate judgmental comments like, “nice work” or “good job” and replace the comments with language that confirms the reader’s precise reading behaviors and enable him to develop new ways of thinking.

When you teach in this way, every time a child reads a book, you have the opportunity to support their construction of an effective literacy processing system. Instead of teaching your student “how to read this book,” your student will learn “how to read.” We refer to this as “generative” reading power.

How do these ideas make you think about your moment-to-moment responses to readers within the act of teaching?  We encourage you to continue the conversation  with your colleagues about the language you can use to support “generative learning” in your classroom/school.


This blog first appeared on the Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative blog. To read more visit https://lesleyuniversitycrrlc.wordpress.com/

For more information about responsive teaching from Fountas and Pinnell:

Explore the NEW Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades www.fountasandpinnell.com/professionalbooks/

Join the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Community for collaborative conversation https://www.facebook.com/groups/FountasPinnell/


References:
Clay, Marie, M. (1991). Becoming Literate: The Construction of Inner Control. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. (2017). Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. (2012). Prompting Guide Part 1 for Oral Reading and Early Writing. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

August 9. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 08/09/2016

When reading is viewed as thinking, students bring their voices to every text and benefit from the voices expressed by the myriad of authors before them.